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M. Bakri Musa

Seeing Malaysia My Way

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Location: Morgan Hill, California, United States

Malaysian-born Bakri Musa writes frequently on issues affecting his native land. His essays have appeared in the Far Eastern Economic Review, Asiaweek, International Herald Tribune, Education Quarterly, SIngapore's Straits Times, and The New Straits Times. His commentary has aired on National Public Radio's Marketplace. His regular column Seeing It My Way appears in Malaysiakini. Bakri is also a regular contributor to th eSun (Malaysia). He has previously written "The Malay Dilemma Revisited: Race Dynamics in Modern Malaysia" as well as "Malaysia in the Era of Globalization," "An Education System Worthy of Malaysia," "Seeing Malaysia My Way," and "With Love, From Malaysia." Bakri's day job (and frequently night time too!) is as a surgeon in private practice in Silicon Valley, California. He and his wife Karen live on a ranch in Morgan Hill. This website is updated twice a week on Sundays and Wednesdays at 5 PM California time.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Deciding Who To Vote For, Part 4: Hung Parliament Not Necessarily Bad


Deciding Who To Vote For In the Next Election
M. Bakri Musa
www.bakrimusa.com


Downstream Analysis:  A Hung Parliament Is Not Necessarily Bad
(Last of Four Parts)

Many fear a hung parliament as they think that would lead to chaos and uncertainty. Yes, there may be both but neither is inevitable. On the contrary I see many potentially redeeming aspects that could benefit citizens, the permanent establishment, and yes, even those politicians.

            For citizens, seeing these freshly-victorious politicians brazenly jockeying for positions would be both instructive and revealing. It would be quite a sight to watch them behave worse than hookers. At least hookers are consumed with satisfying their present customers first, and would solicit new ones only after they have done that. More importantly, they do both discreetly. Those politicians on the other hand would be openly and lustily auctioning themselves to the highest bidder without even a promise of satisfactory performance to their current customers – citizens who had only recently voted for them. Those politicians would whore themselves brazenly. What matters to them would only be the price their new customers would be willing to pay, regardless how filthy and disease-ridden they are. Damn the consequences, for them or the nation.

            The jockeying would be intense, shameless and endlessly shifting, threatening both Barisan and Pakatan. It would not be below MCA for example, to align itself with DAP and throw their weight behind Pakatan, demanding an outrageous price in return. Or MCA could demand a stiff price for remaining in Barisan. Not to be outdone, as alluded earlier, PAS could bolt Pakatan and align itself with UMNO in an ugly chauvinistic attempt at reviving Ketuanan Melayu. UMNO would sell its soul to get PAS support, and PAS in turn would readily sign a pact with the devil given the right price. There would be only one certainty; our politicians would finally be exposed for all their corruptness and hideousness. In the end unfortunately, citizens and Malaysia would be paying the terrible price.

            Perhaps the nation needs such a sordid spectacle to jolt it into realizing that elections have consequences, and that the politicians and leaders we have today are far different from the earlier generation that brought us merdeka.

            On the other hand, our politicians may well surprise us. Without being unnecessarily Pollyannaish, a few might discover that politics is after all a noble profession, and at its best and essence, a fine exercise in the art of compromise in order to get things done for the good of all.

            At the very least a hung parliament would prompt us to be more prudent on our voting and not be so casual with this important exercise of democracy. If that would also encourage otherwise thoughtful Malaysians to offer themselves as candidates, then the whole exercise would not have been futile.

            A hung parliament would also have a salutary effect on the permanent establishment. The last time there was a similar debacle, in Perak following the 2008 elections, the permanent establishment including the sultan, did not acquit themselves well. Who could forget the spectacle of the Speaker being hauled out of the Assembly desperately clinging on to his chair, or the Raja Muda, the Sultan’s representative, being forced to cool his heels in an adjacent room while waiting out the mayhem? It was not pretty. The stench stained all, and stayed to this day.

            You can be certain that this time, with the real possibility of Barisan being toppled, members of the permanent establishment would be more circumspect for their own selfish reasons. Thus I do not expect blatant displays of partisanship as we saw in Perak. To add flavor to that, the King today, Sultan Halim, was the Sultan of Kedah when PAS took over from UMNO. Thus working with a non-UMNO chief executive would not be a novelty for him.

            Once we have established this fact at the federal level, all the other sultans at the state level would follow suit. They would, out of concern for their own survival, no longer be so blatantly partisan. That can only be good for them and the country.

            A hung parliament is nothing to fear; it is just another though less clear-cut expression of a Barisan defeat. Stated differently, a hung parliament is a not-so-pretty Pakatan victory.


1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

wHY maintain a defective administration when it is proven to be corrupt but also continue to be hated by the masses ...

The ONLY and MAIN reason why UMNO is fighting hard to WIN - is because it needs to keep the many skeletons it has kept hidden remain hidden.

The 6th of MAY will mean the end of BN and UMNO, it will be the day people the likes of ROSMAH MANSOR, TAIB MAHMUD, NAJIB himself,TENGKU ADNAN,ZAHID HAMIDI, NAZRI AZIZ, ISA SAMAD,MUSA AMAN, CHUA SOI LEK, past BN leaders MAHATHIR MOHAMAD,SAMY VELLU, RAHIM THAMBY CHIK, SHAHRIZAT JALIL will liken to be the DAY the ANGEL of DEATH will be staring in their FACES,

It will be the day that they had wished that they had never been bORN into this WORLD, and had never entered POLITICS,

IT will be JUDGEMENT DAY for them causing many to suffer STROKE, HEART ATTACKS, CHRONIC DEMENTIA

IT will be a DAY of CELEBRATION for the new FOUND FREEDOM and JUSTICE for the MILLIONS of MALAYSIAN

IT will be the DAY the BATTLE by many will be remembered

AND many in the CIVIL SERVICE, will begin to wonder what will happen them for their wrong doing in helping their masters remain in POWER. The likes of the EC Chairman, the likes of the Chief Secretary to the Cabinet, the likes of the FALSE Attorney General .... probably be will be shitting in their PANTS ....

6 days to GO - MALAYSIA will once again be INDEPENDENT and time for the population to celebrate.

I personally hope to see the day ROSMAH hauled to KAMUNTING or JEREJAK

2:01 AM  

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